Mother’s Kitchen

Debbie left school when her parents split up, she stayed on with her father in the home. Her grandma said there was a job down at the nursing home caring for the residents – it would be a steady job. Debbie was taken on. Sitting out at morning tea she looked out of place, alone. The older women talked about the waste, the pity of it – said she ought to get another job – that got her more in touch with young people. But not knowing how to go about it, Debbie stayed with the job, attracted the attention of Mick, the cook, who talked to the hostel manager and got her working with him in the kitchen.

Mick got offered another job – to be the chef manager at the Mother’s Kitchen restaurant – asked Debbie to come on as staff. Debbie went to work with Mick.

Late hours together, they started up a relationship – Mick had been married sometime – there was a wife and kids that lived somewhere, that Mick never went to visit.  Mick had friends that he used to hang out with when the Kitchen closed. It was here that Debbie first saw cocaine, saw cocaine being used. It scared her a lot that they used cocaine but Mick told her to chill – no one bothers about cocaine – half the city uses it – it’s the only way to party.

Debbie didn’t feel ready to move in with Mick, but then the family home got sold, her father’s new partner made it clear she didn’t want Debbie around. Debbie moved in with Mick.

Mick kind of changed once Debbie moved in, like she was taken for granted, she would want to go home to bed, Mick would want to party. Debbie wanted Mick all to herself at home, wanted him to stop the cocaine parties – no, she wouldn’t do cocaine – she’d have a couple of drinks. Mick wasn’t quite so attentive to Deb at the parties now he had her at home. Deb noticed him flirting with other women. One night she got so incensed at him ignoring her, she told him she was leaving early and flounced out of the room.

Mick didn’t come back til late morning he hadn’t been home long when there was two men knocking on the door wanting a word with Mick. Mick went off with them, and he didn’t come back.

Deb had to start the Kitchen without him – lucky it was a quiet night. Debbie called the owner late next morning for news of Mick – the owner told Debbie to cook until Mick turned up – which he never did. Which is how Debbie got into being the cook at Mother’s Kitchen, spending her nights alone, spending her days with her eye on the door – wanting Mick to appear.

Debbie was a kindly soul, made people feel wanted. They inhaled her food, never wanted to go home. People respected that Debbie seemed to have some private thing that she never took up any offers to go out with men, and there was plenty that asked her.

All was happy until one day Mick re-appeared on the scene. Tired after work, Debbie went back to the flat – found Mick on the couch, discovered that he’d broken in through the bedroom window. Money said Mick, I need a fix – let’s get down to the ATM. Debbie in shock went where he led her, got the money, gave it to Mick. Wait up said Mick – we got some talking to do – as if she could go to sleep.

Mick returned, so wasted, so thin, Debbie wanted so much to hold him, but this couldn’t be, she couldn’t allow him – ok then, just one night.

It’s a dreary thing cocaine addiction, Debbie soon found out – she only made one rule for Mick that he was never, ever for any reason to come into the Kitchen – otherwise she decided that caring must be her fate. Most of the time Mick lounged around in the flat, in moods of deep depression, no company, no charm – a millstone round her neck that she lacked the courage to do anything about – and of course she gave him money – tried to do the right thing – tried to get him tidied up so that he could look for a job.

Then Debbie felt ill one day and the doctor confirmed she was pregnant. Despair filled Debbie’s soul. She thought about Mick’s wife and kids that were somewhere in the town, how could she work with a baby in hand, Mick would never support her. This baby would wreck everything. Debbie had a termination.

A few months later and Debbie felt sad, for no particular reason, life had become a chore. One night she came home from the Kitchen, feeling dead on her feet. Came into the flat and saw Mick hunched over some lines, sitting at the coffee table.

Debbie felt her eyes widen, felt a sharp intake of breath – went and leaned over Mick’s shoulder, and feeling relaxed she said – Hey, Mick – gimme some of that Marching Powder – I think I need a break

 

Drug addiction symptoms or behaviors include:

  • Needing to use the drug regularly — this can be daily or even several times a day
  • Failing in attempts to stop using the drug
  • Needing to maintain a supply of the drug
  • Spending money on the drug even though though the user can’t afford it.
  • Doing things to obtain the drug that they normally wouldn’t do, such as stealing
  • Needing the drug to deal with problems
  • Driving or doing other risky activities when under the influence of the drug
  • Focusing more time and energy on getting and using the drug

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